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MicroView – Arduino with a built-in OLED display

I am really excited about backing a new project “MicroView” – an Arduino Microcontroller with built-in OLED display.

GENERAL SPECS

  • Support for the Arduino IDE 1.0+ (OSX/Win/Linux)
  • 100% Arduino Compatible
  • Built-in 64×48 OLED display
  • Direct 3.3VDC – 16VDC power, input, no power regulator needed
  • Standard DIP Package
  • Breadboard friendly or direct solder

HARDWARE SPECS

  • Display: 64×48 OLED Display
  • Microcontroller: ATmega328P
  • Operating Voltage: 5V
  • Input Voltage: 3.3VDC – 16VDC
  • Digital I/O Pins: 12 (of which 3 provide PWM output)
  • Analog Input Pins: 6
  • Flash Memory: 32 KB
  • SRAM: 2 KB
  • EEPROM: 1 Kilobyte
  • Clock Speed: 16 Mhz
  • No other components required

This will be a great addition for projects where we have to use small display for displaying  critical information and status of the sensors if needed. It would be great if they can make an enclosure and Bluetooth BLE built in. It would be a great add-on for fast prototyping and connecting the device to your mobile devices.

Back the project and get your own Mircoview on Kickstarter.

Capacitive touch Drumkit with Raspberry Pi using MRP121

Couple of weeks ago I backed a new project Touch Board: Interactivity Everywhere on kickstater. This project excited me so much and I couldn’t wait for the finished product to arrive in March. I started to search for capacitive touch chips and finally landed on MPR121 breakout board on Sparkfun. Ordered them and received it 2 days ago and could not wait anymore and directly jumped into building a drums kit.

To make this work I did some research and everything was available but from different website. In this article I will put everything together in one place. I will go step by step

What do you need ?

1) Raspberry PI loaded with Raspbian OS.
2) MPR121 Capacitive Touch Sensor Breakout Board
3) Aluminium Foil for touch board
4) Connecting Wires

Configure I2C

I2C is a very commonly used standard designed to allow one chip to talk to another. So, since the Raspberry Pi can talk I2C we can connect it to a variety of I2C capable chips and modules. Please follow anyone of the following links to configure I2C on your Raspberry pi.

I2C and Raspbian wheezy
Adafruit’s Raspberry Pi Lesson 4. GPIO Setup

Connect the circuit

Can you detect the address of the MPR121 board ?

If you are not able to see 5a, try the command with i2cdetect -y 0. Still no luck! Google is your friend…

Download Code

Thanks to Scott Garner has contributed the complete source code of the beetbox. Download the code from github and run the program.

You should be able to hear the sound when you touch the foil inputs. If you are not able to hear the sound you can refer to this article to play sound file from command prompt in Raspberry Pi.

Thanks to Bare Conductive for inspiring this project… 😉

UDOO – Quad Core Computer and powerful dedicated ARM for the GPIO

Yayy! Received my UDOO board today and it was total surprise. After so many weeks only today I had time to blog about the backed projects in Kickstater and I receive my first backed project delivery today 😉

…..

Kickstarter InfoUDOO is a very powerful board based on dual or quad core ARM cortex-A9 CPU with great performance both on Android and Linux OS, and a dedicated ARM processor for the GPIO. These are the main specifications:

  • Freescale i.MX 6 ARM Cortex-A9 CPU Dual/Quad core 1GHz
  • Integrated graphics, each processor provides 3 separated accelerators for 2D, OpenGL® ES2.0 3D and OpenVG™
  • Atmel SAM3X8E ARM Cortex-M3 CPU (same as Arduino Due)
  • RAM DDR3 1GB
  • 76 fully available GPIO
  • Arduino-compatible R3 1.0 pinout
  • HDMI and LVDS + Touch (I2C signals)
  • Ethernet RJ45 (10/100/1000 MBit)
  • WiFi Module
  • Mini USB and Mini USB OTG
  • USB type A (x2) and USB connector (requires a specific wire)
  • Analog Audio and Mic
  • SATA (Only Quad-Core version)
  • Camera connection
  • Micro SD (boot device)
  • Power Supply 12V and External Battery connector

I has the UDOO now and will post more details and benchmarks soon 😉

Working with Raspberry Pi Camera Rev 1.3

Fastest online delivery I had ever experienced  was with Raspberry Pi Camera from RS Components. I received the package in 3days for a shipment fee of 8 USD.

The setup was very straight forward and simple, just follow the link. A sample shot taken using the camera, it has come out bad that is due to me not fixing the camera properly.

Raspberry-Pi-Camera-Shot

 

Going to attempt time lapse photography… will keep you posted 😉

Raspberry Pi with Redundant Power Supply

Everyday I get lot of ideas for Raspberry Pi. One such is to make it mobile like integrate it with my car. In that case I have to think of alternative power source if my car is not running. Lipo Rider Pro from SeeedStudio came to my rescue.LiPo Rider ProFeatures

  • Maximum 1A load output
  • Battery and Solar panel connector is JST 2.0
  • Stable 5V USB power supply regardless of source
  • Charge/Recharge algorithms built into chip
  • Charge Lithium Polymer Battery through solar power or USB
  • Stable supply voltage through either lithium battery or USB
  • 2 x USB ports let you program your kit while charging your Lithium battery
  • LED indications for battery full or charging states
  • 4 green LED instruct quantity of electricity of lithium battery

The above pictures shows that how I have implemented the Lipo Rider board for redundant power supply. I am not sure how efficient this will be on the move, so far I am happy that it is doing what it is supposed to do. Sometimes I get a feeling that the battery pack is always being used and it is not getting charged even if the USB power is connected. Have to debug this further 😉

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