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Capacitive touch Drumkit with Raspberry Pi using MRP121

Couple of weeks ago I backed a new project Touch Board: Interactivity Everywhere on kickstater. This project excited me so much and I couldn’t wait for the finished product to arrive in March. I started to search for capacitive touch chips and finally landed on MPR121 breakout board on Sparkfun. Ordered them and received it 2 days ago and could not wait anymore and directly jumped into building a drums kit.

To make this work I did some research and everything was available but from different website. In this article I will put everything together in one place. I will go step by step

What do you need ?

1) Raspberry PI loaded with Raspbian OS.
2) MPR121 Capacitive Touch Sensor Breakout Board
3) Aluminium Foil for touch board
4) Connecting Wires

Configure I2C

I2C is a very commonly used standard designed to allow one chip to talk to another. So, since the Raspberry Pi can talk I2C we can connect it to a variety of I2C capable chips and modules. Please follow anyone of the following links to configure I2C on your Raspberry pi.

I2C and Raspbian wheezy
Adafruit’s Raspberry Pi Lesson 4. GPIO Setup

Connect the circuit

Can you detect the address of the MPR121 board ?

If you are not able to see 5a, try the command with i2cdetect -y 0. Still no luck! Google is your friend…

Download Code

Thanks to Scott Garner has contributed the complete source code of the beetbox. Download the code from github and run the program.

You should be able to hear the sound when you touch the foil inputs. If you are not able to hear the sound you can refer to this article to play sound file from command prompt in Raspberry Pi.

Thanks to Bare Conductive for inspiring this project… 😉

New in Town – Cubieboard3 aka CubieTruck

Cubietruck is the 3rd board of Cubieteam, we also name it Cubieboard3. It’s a new PCB model adopted with Allwinner A20 main chip, the same with Cubieboard2. But it is enhanced with some features, such as 2GB memory, VGA display interface on-board, 1000M NIC, WIFI+BT on-board, support Li-battery and RTC, SPDIF audio interface.

Features

  • Allwinner Tech A20 SOC
  • SATA supported
  • 54 extended pins
  • Built-in HDMI/ VGA display interface
  • Built-in WIFI+BT module
  • 2GB DDR3 RAM
  • Built-in IR receiver
  • SPDIF audio interface

Specifications

  • Allwinner Tech SOC A20 ARM® Cortex™-A7 Dual-Core ARM® Mali400 MP2 Complies with OpenGL ES 2.0/1.1
  • 2GB DDR3@480MHz
  • HDMI&VGA 1080P display output on-board
  • 10M/100M/1G Ethernet
  • WIFI + BT wireless connection with antenna on-board
  • SATA 2.0 interface support 2.5’ HDD (for 3.5’ HDD, only need another 12V power input)
  • Storage solution NAND + MicroSD
  • 2 x USB HOST, 1 x OTG, 1 x SPDIF, 1 x IR, 4 x LEDs, 1 x Headphone, 3 x Keys
  • Power DC5V@2.5A with HDD support Li-battery & RTC
  • 54 extended pins including I2S, I2C, SPI, CVBS, LRADC x2,UART, PS2, PWM x2, TS/CSI, IRDA, LINEIN&FMIN&MICIN, TVIN x4 with 2.0 pitch connectors
  • PCB size 11cm *8cm*1.4mm

Received my board last week. Out of all the board I had tested so far this one is the most powerful I have tested. Really enjoying the performance so far but need to hack in more for the Bluetooth and other options which is built in the board. Will keep posted 🙂

Fun With Raspberry Pi, Able-HD monitor as Media Center Using XBMC

Last week I received an email from Able-HD monitor team that my screen is shipped and it’s tracking number. They apologized for being late with the tracking code. When I tracked the shipment it had already arrived in my postbox and been waiting for a week. I went immediately and collected it before they sent it back for not collecting. After collecting I tested using Apple TV and it was gorgeous. The only comment I have to the Able-HD team is the connector is very small, if it was little longer it would have been better placing the driver circuit and the LED screen properly.

Later during the weekend I took my Raspberry Pi and decided to make it a home media center and to use the new screen. After many trials installing XBMC I was successful in running Raspbmc successfully in a decent speed.

I was able to play movies in airplay and it was playing okay.

Verdict: Raspberry Pi needs more memory to buffer 😉

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